Graduate

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Course Description

All courses are conducted in the Chinese language.

HC7101 Graduate Seminar

This course explores themes in Chinese studies in the areas of Chinese culture, literature, language, history, philosophy and/or arts. The course comprises a series of seminar presentations and discussions on selected topics or topics of special interest to the students. Topics chosen will vary from year to year, depending on student enrollment and the availability of guest speakers. Students who complete this subject will gain familiarity with academic discourse in different subject areas. The course will be conducted in Chinese but English reading materials may be included. Students are required to complete a term paper and in class oral presentation. Written project involves either an analysis or a critical review on reading materials or on particular aspect of student's research interest.

HC7102 Shi ji and Early Chinese Historiography: Critical Reading and Cross-disciplinary Perspectives 

This course is designed to provide an advanced introduction of Shi Ji through critical reading of some representative chapters based on cross-disciplinary perspectives. The purpose of this course is for our graduate students to acquire skills for the understanding of classical Chinese texts and subsequently commentaries based on their own specialization and to achieve a thorough understanding of the early Chinese historiography as well as biographical literature. Students will be expected to complete weekly readings and weekly analysis, and to present findings and write papers on specific topics.

HC7001 Special Topics in Selected Historical Personages of Singapore & Malaysia

In-depth study in one or two of important historical figures, such as Lim Boon Keng, Song Ong Siang, Wu Lien Teh, Tan Kah Kee, Tan Lark Sye and Tan Cheng Lock. Focus is on the historical and social background of the person under study, his cultural and political identity, his personal achievements and contributions, as well as the interaction between the individual actor and the larger environment.

HC7002 Special Topics in the Singapore Chinese Intellectual

A detailed study of selected topics in the Singapore Chinese intellectual. Comparison and contrast of various archetypes and representatives. Analysis of how they contradicted and cooperated with each other. Examination of the roles of each archetype in the development of history.

HC7003 Special Topics in Chinese Overseas and Their Relations with China

Over different periods of time, many towns and villages in China have evolved, socially and economically, as a result of changing relations with the Chinese working and living outside China. This course explores specifically the localities with past or present connections with Chinese diaspora, collectively and fashionably labeled as qiaoxiang areas. The aim is twofold. The first is to shed light on the changing landscape of these localities amidst the political and economic developments in China. The second is to identify the pattern and content of the relations Chinese diaspora have with their native and ancestral homelands in China. Course Evaluation: There will be no exam for this course. Final course grade will be based on the evaluation of writing assignments / oral presentation / research paper.

HC7004 Special Topics in Chinese Oral Literature

Studies of the Chinese Oral Tradition. Selected topics such as the following may be examined: Oral Theories, its application and implication in Chinese oral literature; Historical Development and Transmission; Continuity and Authenticity; Orality and Literacy; Oral-derived Texts and literary features; Compositional Methods. Different genres such as the Transformation Texts Singing Narrative, Drum Songs Medleys, and Precious Scrolls will be examined.

HC7005 Special Topics in Pre-Modern Chinese Literature

This course analyses topically the important writers and works in pre-modern Chinese Literature (from Pre-Qin period to the Qing dynasty). Genres include poetry, prose, fiction and drama. Aspects of Chinese culture will be noted through readings.

HC7006 Special Topics in Modern/Contemporary Chinese Literature

In-depth study of selected modern/contemporary authors. Selected topics such as the following may be examined: Comparative Literary Criticism on selected works; Critical Textual Analysis; Transition and Transformation from Modern to Contemporary; Impact of the Cultural Revolution; Modernity and Post-Modernity.

HC7007 Study of Gao Xingjian

The first Chinese-language writer to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2000, Gao Xingjian is a multi-faceted individual. This module will study the man, his dramatic works, theatrical productions, novels and short stories, theoretical concepts and intellectual thoughts. The study of Gao Xingjian will be carried out with cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural approaches, involving in-depth analysis of Gao's works with literary and performance theories, as well as treating Gao as a significant cultural phenomenon in the context of post-Mao China and transcultural exchanges.

HC7008 Special Topics in Contrastive Language Analysis

Study of topics such as contrastive studies in language such as contrastive rhetoric, contrastive lexicology, contrastive pragmatics, contrastive semantics, contrastive syntax, contrastive pedagogy, compiling and exploiting bilingual/multilingual computerised corpora, bilingual corpora and automatic/computer-aided translation.

HC7009 Modern Linguistics Theories in their Applications in the Study of the Chinese Language

Study of important linguistic theories and their relevance in the Chinese Language. The course will trace the development of linguistic theories with respect to the Chinese Language since late 19th century, examine how these theories are being adapted to describe and explain phenomenon of the Chinese Language, reviewing the unresolved issues that arosed and exploring future research directions.

HC7010 Special Topics in Pre-Modern Chinese

Study of selected topics in the study of Pre-modern Chinese covering aspects such as synchronic and diachronic syntax, lexicology, semantic and phonology; discourse; rhetoric and other functionalist approaches in selected texts, examining their relevance to modern Chinese.

HC7011 The End of the Chinese Middle Ages

This course seeks to explore the drastic and all-embracing changes that Chinese society has undergone from the 8th to the 13th century. We will discuss a wide range of topics including elite transformation, state examinations, social status, family strategies, literature, philosophy, ritual, and religion. The goal is to develop a deeper understanding of medieval and pre-modern China. Readings are mainly modern research in Chinese and English. Course Evaluation: There will be no exam for this course. Final course grade will be based on the evaluation of short essays / oral presentation / research paper.

HC7012 Research and Methodology

This course explores different themes, research and methodology in the areas of Chinese culture, literature, language, history, and philosophy. The course comprises of a series of seminar presentations and discussions on selected topics or topics of special interest to the students. Topics chosen will vary from year to year, depending on student enrollment and the research areas of the scholars conducting the class. Students who complete this subject will gain familiarity with different research methods and experience diverse academic discourse in different subject areas. The course will be conducted in Chinese but English reading materials may be included.

HC7013 Translation and Modern China

This course aims at providing a comprehensive training in translation theories, with emphasis on the new discipline known as Translation Studies emerged in the 1970s. The course will illustrate the application and understanding of the theories with special case study in Modern China. Students will have a good grasp of various schools of thoughts in translation theories and a thorough understanding of the modern literary and cultural history.

HC7014 A Study of Chinese-Language Film Culture

This course will analyse the camera movements and voices of Chinese-language film using the research paradigms of national cinema, transnational cinema, Sinophone cinemas, star studies, film genre, and auteur theory, in addition to their interactions with early popular culture and local history in various regions. This course also requires collation of historical files and incidents relating to film culture and language policies in different areas, and collecting records of films, film stars, and other early popular culture in old newspapers from various regions. In addition, interviews with directors, stars, or other film workers will be traced in order to examine the transnational production model and ideology of the Chinese-language film industry.

HC7015 Study of Text and Image and East Asian Cultural Interaction

This course introduces the contemporary scholar’s theoretical approaches of the study of text & image in the context of East Asia, such as the relationships between poems and paintings, intertextuality and comparison of the content of the texts and images. Students are required to find the interested and meaningful texts and images in the context of East Asia as the example to analyze the idea of those approaches of study of text and image which is covered in the course.

HC7888 Directed Reading

In this course students read extensively in their area of interest under the direction of a faculty member, most likely the supervisor. This course is taken by graduate students on a subject which is not otherwise offered as a course in the MA/PhD program modules in a given semester, but which accords with a member of the academic staff's research interests. The courses offer a great flexibility in adapting to the individual academic interests of the student the research interests of the teacher. Students wishing to take this course should obtain prior agreement of the teacher concerned and his/her Head of Division. Course Evaluation: Assessment is by course-work only. That is either (a) one 8,000 - 10,000 word essay delivered at the end of the semester, or (b) a series of two or more essays together amounting to 8,000 - 10,000 words produced over the period of one academic

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